What is a Doreanthus plant and how is it best maintained?

March 10, 2010


What type of plant is an Doreanthus (Mezoo)? Is it a annual or a perennial?  What type of light does it need?

Thank-You, Sue

Dear Sue,

I am so happy you asked about the doreanthus plant. I have two growing from slips taken last all from discarded planters. I got the plants without knowing the botanical name, or any name for that matter and so my search for the answer to your question answered one of my own. 

Doreanthus or Dorotheanthus bellidiflorus mezoo is a trailing annual with succulent leaves and very small daisy like flowers. It is a native of Southern Africa, and likes arid conditions. It is similar to the Ice Plant (Delosperma). It is sometimes called by its old name Mesembryanthemum. Livingstone Daisy is its common name and seems easier to remember and spell. Livingstone daisies are annuals that like sunny locations and dry conditions.

Thanks for the challenge and helping me identify one of my favorite plants.

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14 Responses to “What is a Doreanthus plant and how is it best maintained?”

  1. kayeJune 4, 2012 at 4:11 pm #

    will this plant winter over in the house?

    • Pahl's MarketJune 8, 2012 at 9:34 am #

      Dorotheanthus mezoo is a succulent type annual. It is grown best in full sun and is fairly drought tolerant. Thanks!

  2. Karen FrederickAugust 15, 2012 at 4:44 pm #

    Can I take this plant inside for the winter?

    • Pahl's MarketAugust 21, 2012 at 1:29 pm #

      You could try and bring it in for the winter, you should have a good shot at it. It is a succulent so bring it in before the evening temperatures are consistently 50 degrees or less – most likely pretty soon. Put it in a bright window, south or east facing are best. Good Luck!

  3. Jacky RuckerJanuary 12, 2014 at 12:29 pm #

    I brought my mezoo plant inside for the winter. But, I’ve noticed spider webs all over it. How should I take care of this problem. Thank you

    • Pahl's MarketJanuary 13, 2014 at 11:39 am #

      Spider webs could be a sign your plant has spider mites. It is best to take care of this as soon as you notice the webs. Turn the plant on its side in the sink or shower and spray with a cold gentle stream of water. Be sure to rinse all the leaves including the underside of them. It would also be a good idea to treat with a systemic insecticide.

  4. JanSeptember 13, 2014 at 8:15 am #

    Is Dorotheanthus poison if a animals should eat it? Have cats and not sure.Would like to bring it in and give it a try for the winter months.

    • Chris KaufenbergSeptember 15, 2014 at 2:51 pm #

      No, as far as we know it is not poisonous. Before you bring any plants in for the winter it is always good to treat the plant with a granular systemic household insecticide. It would also like a bright window for winter. Good Luck!

  5. Lonnie WestoverOctober 2, 2014 at 9:01 am #

    Should you trim the plant back any for the winter, I have kept the guys growing through the winter for 4 years now… Love this plant…

    • Chris KaufenbergOctober 11, 2014 at 2:51 pm #

      Hi Lonnie, thanks for your question. Go ahead and cut the plant about half way back, treat it with a household insecticide and then bring it in.

  6. Lonnie.WestoverApril 27, 2015 at 5:20 pm #

    Do I trim my plants back, now that it’s spring… I’ve kept my plants alive for going on 5 years now… I would like for them to grow thicker…

    • Chris KaufenbergMay 2, 2015 at 2:46 pm #

      Hi Lonnie, without knowing what kind of plants you are referring to it is hard to give you a specific answer. In general most plants benefit from a slight trim about 1/4 of the total height in the Spring. After trimming it is a good idea to fertilize. For specific plant care question please give us a call at 952 431-4345.

  7. Linda S LaveryJune 10, 2015 at 9:19 am #

    I am surprised that my Livingstone Daisy can be in full sun. I have a decorated ladder I want to put it on where the East sun and the midday sun will be hitting it. Is that too much sun. This plant is new to me and I fell in love with it at the nursery. I don’t want to lose it

    • Chris KaufenbergJune 10, 2015 at 10:23 am #

      Hi Linda, thanks for your question. The Livingstone Daisy does well in full to partial sun, sounds like it should do well where you plan to put it.

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