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What is a Doreanthus plant and how is it best maintained?

by | Mar 10, 2010 | Resources, Market News, Ask Pahl's Market

What type of plant is an Doreanthus (Mezoo)? Is it a annual or a perennial?  What type of light does it need?

Thank-You, Sue

Dear Sue,

I am so happy you asked about the doreanthus plant. I have two growing from slips taken last all from discarded planters. I got the plants without knowing the botanical name, or any name for that matter and so my search for the answer to your question answered one of my own. 

Doreanthus or Dorotheanthus bellidiflorus mezoo is a trailing annual with succulent leaves and very small daisy like flowers. It is a native of Southern Africa, and likes arid conditions. It is similar to the Ice Plant (Delosperma). It is sometimes called by its old name Mesembryanthemum. Livingstone Daisy is its common name and seems easier to remember and spell. Livingstone daisies are annuals that like sunny locations and dry conditions.

Thanks for the challenge and helping me identify one of my favorite plants.

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29 Comments

  1. kaye

    will this plant winter over in the house?

    Reply
    • Pahl's Market

      Dorotheanthus mezoo is a succulent type annual. It is grown best in full sun and is fairly drought tolerant. Thanks!

      Reply
  2. Karen Frederick

    Can I take this plant inside for the winter?

    Reply
    • Pahl's Market

      You could try and bring it in for the winter, you should have a good shot at it. It is a succulent so bring it in before the evening temperatures are consistently 50 degrees or less – most likely pretty soon. Put it in a bright window, south or east facing are best. Good Luck!

      Reply
  3. Jacky Rucker

    I brought my mezoo plant inside for the winter. But, I’ve noticed spider webs all over it. How should I take care of this problem. Thank you

    Reply
    • Pahl's Market

      Spider webs could be a sign your plant has spider mites. It is best to take care of this as soon as you notice the webs. Turn the plant on its side in the sink or shower and spray with a cold gentle stream of water. Be sure to rinse all the leaves including the underside of them. It would also be a good idea to treat with a systemic insecticide.

      Reply
  4. Jan

    Is Dorotheanthus poison if a animals should eat it? Have cats and not sure.Would like to bring it in and give it a try for the winter months.

    Reply
    • Chris Kaufenberg

      No, as far as we know it is not poisonous. Before you bring any plants in for the winter it is always good to treat the plant with a granular systemic household insecticide. It would also like a bright window for winter. Good Luck!

      Reply
  5. Lonnie Westover

    Should you trim the plant back any for the winter, I have kept the guys growing through the winter for 4 years now… Love this plant…

    Reply
    • Chris Kaufenberg

      Hi Lonnie, thanks for your question. Go ahead and cut the plant about half way back, treat it with a household insecticide and then bring it in.

      Reply
    • rosemary

      Lonnie … I have this in an old birdbath, so can’t bring the whole beast indoors … can I take a piece of it … to pot up somehow … to overwinter in the house? Rose

      Reply
      • Chris Kaufenberg

        You could sure give it a try. Take a cutting and root in water. Once it roots plant it in potting soil. Keep the container in a sunny window and keep moderately moist. Good Luck!

        Reply
  6. Lonnie.Westover

    Do I trim my plants back, now that it’s spring… I’ve kept my plants alive for going on 5 years now… I would like for them to grow thicker…

    Reply
    • Chris Kaufenberg

      Hi Lonnie, without knowing what kind of plants you are referring to it is hard to give you a specific answer. In general most plants benefit from a slight trim about 1/4 of the total height in the Spring. After trimming it is a good idea to fertilize. For specific plant care question please give us a call at 952 431-4345.

      Reply
  7. Linda S Lavery

    I am surprised that my Livingstone Daisy can be in full sun. I have a decorated ladder I want to put it on where the East sun and the midday sun will be hitting it. Is that too much sun. This plant is new to me and I fell in love with it at the nursery. I don’t want to lose it

    Reply
    • Chris Kaufenberg

      Hi Linda, thanks for your question. The Livingstone Daisy does well in full to partial sun, sounds like it should do well where you plan to put it.

      Reply
  8. F Hill

    Great to know that the Mezoo is so well loved.
    My first year with it as an outside plant . It has grown reaching 3/4 from grown in a outside corner planter
    That’s a least four and one half in height. Would love to salvage for next year. Suggestions are
    welcome. Have several cuts that are rooting. Just wish I could bring the plant in for the winter.

    Reply
    • Chris Kaufenberg

      Thanks for your comments. You should give it a try, be sure to place it in a bright area – south or east facing. Also, bring in before overnight temps dip into the 50’s.

      Reply
  9. Kathleen J. Neiman

    I was watching a cooking show. They were using something called Ice Lettuce which looked like remarkably like Dorotheanthus Mezoo Is this plant edible? Kathleen

    Reply
    • Chris Kaufenberg

      Doreanthus or Dorotheanthus bellidiflorus mezoo is a trailing annual with succulent leaves and very small daisy like flowers. It is a native of Southern Africa, and likes arid conditions. It is similar to the Ice Plant (Delosperma), genus Aptenia, but not the same. Doreanthus is not edible.

      Reply
  10. Paula Chambers

    I am so grateful for this information as I purchased a Doroanthus Mezoo today. I was unfamiliar with the plant name and appearance. Looking it up gives me great anticipation to care for this little plant. I live in the Okanagan Valley of B.C. Canada. Our weather in the summer and of late has been 30 – 32 Celsius. Unusual to be this hot in May. Not quite South Africa …..! But warm enough.

    Reply
  11. Dawn Peterson

    I am trying to locate the plant “Livingstone Daisy Mezoo Trailing Red” or as it is also known, “Dorotheanthus” would you have any in stock? I have been all over the web and cannot find anything but seeds, so I’m looking for live plants. Could you let me know if you have any and how much they are

    Reply
    • Chris Kaufenberg

      Thanks for checking with us Dawn. We did carry the Meezoo Trailing Red Dorotheanthus this Spring in a 4.5″ container but no longer have them in stock. Please check with us again next Spring!

      Reply
    • Rona

      I live in central Florida and I got my dorotheanthus either in Lowe’s, home depot or rural king. I was pleasantly surprised when it grew the pretty red flowers. I was looking for a trailing vine like vinca i used in my porch planters when i lived in nyc…it was the closest thing I could find. I’ve grown several clippings successfully by putting them in starter pots, misting the soil and covered with a produce bag with holes for 2 weeks then transplanting them. Just hoping it will overwinter and I’m look into a greenhouse to protect some plants from the short winter cold snaps

      Reply
  12. paula chambers

    To some of the inquiries regarding overwintering the Doroanthus Mezoo. I brought my beautiful plant indoors and put it in a bright window. It did get some dry leaves, but I think it was my fault by leaving it to dry out too much. However, after it has been watered regularly the beautiful foliage looks healthy and thriving. I will be putting it outdoors soon.

    Reply
  13. Susi Byers

    I’ve been keeping a doreanthus going for years, and it’s easy to take a cutting and plunge it in soil. It will root quite quickly. I have the vairhay d one but saw a green one today. Love this perky plant!

    Reply
  14. Stephanie

    My Mezoo is doing way too well and is taking over in my pots. Can I prune it and if so, how?

    Reply
    • Chris Kaufenberg

      Thanks for your question Stephanie. Prune plants freely to maintain the desired size and shape. Pinching plants back stimulates dense, bushy new growth and encourages more flowers.

      Reply
  15. Bonnie

    My mezoos survived a Wisconsin June tornado. In July, I went away for a wedding, and returned to what turned out to be a deer feast. They ate everything down to the nubs. UGH! Most of the mezoo came back nominally, but very few flowers. I am going to bring them inside over winter to see if I can get them to at least flower, if not, last the winter.

    I have loved these for years and have spent a fortune trying to find them every year. Now, I am going to try to keep these for next spring. We’ll see….

    Reply

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