Parsnip Crème Brulee Recipe


Cook Time: 30 minutes
Servings: 4
Ingredients:
6 large Parsnips, peeled and thinly sliced lengthwise
3 cups Heavy cream
1 cup Whole Milk
Pinch of Kosher Salt
6 Egg yolks
1/3 cup light Brown Sugar
1 Tablespoon Vanilla extract
Demerara sugar*
Directions:
1. Preheat the oven to 400°. Place the parsnips on a sheet pan and roast until browned, tender and fragrant, about 25 minutes. Set aside to cool slightly.
2. Lower the oven temperature to 300°. In a medium saucepan set over medium heat, combine the heavy cream, milk, roasted parsnips and salt. Bring to just a boil, then turn off the heat and allow the mixture to steep for 30 minutes.
3. Purée the mixture in a blender, then strain through a fine-mesh sieve. Discard any pulp left at the bottom of the sieve and set the custard aside.
4. In a large heatproof bowl, whisk together the egg yolks and brown sugar. Slowly add the hot-cream mixture, stirring gently. Strain the custard and stir in the vanilla extract.
5. Arrange four 4-ounce ramekins in a roasting pan. Slowly pour the custard into the ramekins, filling them almost to the top. Set the roasting pan in the center of the oven and carefully fill the pan with hot water until the water reaches halfway up the sides of the ramekins. Cover the pan loosely with aluminum foil and bake until the custards are firm at the edges, but still a bit wobbly in the center, about 30 minutes.
6. Transfer the ramekins to a wire rack to cool completely. Cover and refrigerate until cold, at least 3 hours or up to 2 days.
7. To finish, place the ramekins on a sheet pan and sprinkle with Demerara sugar so each crème brûlée is covered evenly. Use a crème brûlée torch or propane torch to caramelize the sugar. Serve immediately.

*(Cook’s Notes: Demerara sugar is a light brown, partially refined sugar. The crystals are large and glossy in appearance. This sugar is produced from the first crystallization during the processing of cane juice into sugar crystals. It has a natural caramel-like flavor. Some areas refer to it as Turbinado sugar, which has more to do with how the sugar is processed in turbines, rather than where it originated. It will add a warm caramel note to your recipes. It is often used sprinkled (sparingly) on the tops of muffins, cakes or even cookies. It can be found in most grocery stores.)

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